Attorney: Ludwig, wife have happy marriage - FOX Carolina 21

Attorney: Ludwig, wife have happy marriage

Posted: Updated: Nov 4, 2011 02:54 PM
Ludwig appears before a judge for a bond hearing. (Nov. 4, 2011/FOX Carolina) Ludwig appears before a judge for a bond hearing. (Nov. 4, 2011/FOX Carolina)
John Ludwig (Greenville County Detention Center) John Ludwig (Greenville County Detention Center)
GREENVILLE, SC (AP/FOX Carolina) -

Greenville businessman John Ludwig, Jr. was arrested Thursday and had a bond hearing Friday at 10 a.m.

Ludwig was charged with criminal domestic violence second offense and was arraigned yesterday, according to the Greenville County Detention Center website.

The arrest warrant states that Ludwig touched/slapped his wife on the back of the head during a verbal fight.

In a bond hearing Friday morning, Ludwig's wife told the judge that police put pressure on her to press charges. She said nothing happened. She said she wasn't hit and they were just having a discussion.

The judge gave Ludwig a $15,000 bond and was ordered to continue mental health treatment. Ludwig was released a short time later.

Police report says Ludwig slapped wife

According to a Greenville Police incident report, police were called by the victim's father. Officers met the victim at the Embassy Suites on Verdae to tell them about the incident around 8:30 p.m. on Thursday.

The report said Ludwig and his wife had been arguing due to his financial troubles. He wanted her to write a check to help pay for their home.

According to the report, his wife went to take a bath before writing the check, angering him further. While in the bathtub, Ludwig hit her in the back of the head with an open hand and then later he became verbal with her.

Ludwig's wife left their home and went to the hotel, calling her father on the way, according to the report.

In the report officers said she did not want Ludwig to go to prison, but wanted documentation of the incident to aid her plans to divorce him. She tried to minimize the slap to a touch, according to officers.

This was not Ludwig's first arrest. In 2009, the 39-year-old former Furman University football player pleaded guilty to reckless homicide after driving his car through a home in Travelers Rest, killing the homeowner Bill Bardsley. A judge gave him probation.

In February of 2010, Ludwig was convicted of criminal domestic violence. Then in August of 2010, he was charged with assault and battery for an incident at a Greenville bar.

Ludwig also faces a federal lawsuit alleging he's hiding $2 million from a creditor he owes nearly $7 million. A federal judge has said he finds evidence of probable fraudulent conduct.

Ludwig is still on probation for the 2009 case (Read more about his history here). It is unknown at this time if this most recent arrest will violate the conditions of that probation.

His attorney Kim Varner said Friday that it was up to the probation officer to decide and the officer would most likely wait for an outcome in the case.

Attorney says Ludwig gets negative treatment

Ludwig's attorney Kim Varner was with Ludwig and his wife when he was released and said the couple has no intentions of getting a divorce, but they love each other and are working on their marriage.

Varner said that she contends she doesn't want to press charges, but that she was on the phone with her parents when they overheard her argument with Ludwig and they called the police.

"If this case wasn't about John Ludwig, it would disappear in two weeks," said Varner.

Varner said that Ludwig's wife plans to sign an affidavit not to prosecute and it will be up to the solicitor's office from there. He also said if she was called to testify, she would not likely go against anything she has said on record.

Varner said that police responded outside of protocol, sending nine officers to the scene, but they did appreciate the fact they responded for a domestic violence case.

Earlier Friday, Varner said that Ludwig and his wife had an argument and she was not threatened. He said she was not harmed in any way, shape or form.

"What was unusual about this is that John does get special treatment, unfortunately it's reversed special treatment rather," said Varner.

Varner said that were several officers there for several hours, leaving Ludwig's wife to feel pressured that she was misconstrued.

"She is not threatened nor scared or frightened by him and nothing happened to her," said Varner.

When Varner was asked if the police made it up, he said "sometimes people read into statements, things that are not actually said." Varner went on to say that she wants Ludwig back home and for him to continue to get the help that he needs.

"I don't think there is any dispute that John has some issues,' said Varner. "He is trying to deal with them the best he can. He is trying to get professional help. And he is doing everything he can to get his life back on course."

When asked about how many changes Ludwig would get with the legal system, Varner said people drive through properties all of the time, citing a recent car driving through a local laundromat.

"I don't think he's going to get anymore than any other person would in his facts and his circumstances," said Varner. "There was a big to do about him running through a house. That just happened the other week at laundry mat. It happens all the time. The fact that he is a prominent member of this community is what drew the newsworthy attention to it."

Police respond to unfair allegations

FOX Carolina asked the Greenville Police to respond to Varner's allegations of unfair treatment towards Ludwig.

The department said they treat criminal domestic violence cases seriously and police officers act accordingly.

"The victim in this case stated that she was struck by the subject," said Alia Urps, with the Greenville Police Department. "That along with the fact that she was visibly in distress and felt it necessary to retreat to a hotel gave officers enough to make an arrest."

In reference to the amount of officers who responded, Urps said that domestic calls are one of the most dangerous calls that officers respond to, so until officers are on scene and can determine that the scene is indeed no longer a threat, more officers will continue to respond.

Copyright 2011 FOX Carolina. All rights reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

What was unusual about this is that john does get special treatment, unfortunately it's reversed special treatment rather than an officer coming out and talking to her. My understanding was there was about 5 to 9 officers there  and they were there from 4.5 to 5.5 hours. She says that she felt pressured that she was misconstrued. She is not threatened nor scared or frightened by him and nothing happened to her. "

Powered by WorldNow
Fox Carolina
Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2014, WHNS; Greenville, SC. (A Meredith Corporation Station) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.