Southern sayings video made by Gaffney native goes viral - FOX Carolina 21

Southern sayings video made by Gaffney native goes viral

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From left: Delaine Yates, Sheila Hawkins, Katherine Bailess and Julia Fowler strut toward the camera in "Sh%t Southern Women Say." (YouTube) From left: Delaine Yates, Sheila Hawkins, Katherine Bailess and Julia Fowler strut toward the camera in "Sh%t Southern Women Say." (YouTube)
GAFFNEY, SC (FOX Carolina) -

"Hey y'all," "Bless your heart" and "I suwannee." Anyone who's grown up in the South has probably heard those sayings at some point. But who knew that those local colloquialisms would be so popular with the rest of the world? Gaffney native Julia Fowler - that's who.

Fowler, an actress who now lives in Los Angeles, wrote and was one of the stars in a YouTube video called, "Sh%t Southern Women Say."

The video starts with Fowler, and her fellow southern actresses Katherine Bailess, Delanie Yates and Shelia Hawkins, strutting toward the camera, followed by three minutes of non-stop, down-home southern speak.

"My daddy's gonna kill you," Fowler said in one of the scenes.

So, to see if her daddy is really that vicious, FOX Carolina's Jennifer Phillips set out to find him. Turns out, Allen Fowler is just as proud of his daughter as he can be.

"The whole project was just to enjoy it," Allen Fowler said in his own deep drawl. "Have fun, and laugh at it, you know?"

Allen Fowler said his daughter started clicking her clogs at a young age, and watched her mother Claudia teach dance classes at a studio in Gaffney. He said his daughter is now an actress, who has appeared on Broadway - ironic considering one of the sayings in the video is, "You couldn't pay me to live in New York."

Fowler's father said she got a lot of what is said in the video from the house in which she grew up.

"My mother said that all the time, 'I suwannee. Bless her heart. I suwannee,'" said Allen Fowler. He said he had a saying of his own that didn't make the video. "'I told you 50-11 times,' I've heard that so much."

Julia Fowler told Phillips by phone from LA that she thinks of the video as her love letter to the South. She said that often times southern women are misrepresented, so she wanted to create the video for the cousins, aunts and grandmothers of the South.

So far, the tongue-in-cheek look at the language of the South has received more than 2.23 million views.

Copyright 2012 FOX Carolina (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

WARNING: This video contains language that may be offensive to some.

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