Floods, cooler temps remain as storms move east - FOX Carolina 21

Floods, cooler temps remain as storms move east

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A car was under water in Etowah after heavy rains moved through the area. (Jan. 30, 2013/FOX Carolina) A car was under water in Etowah after heavy rains moved through the area. (Jan. 30, 2013/FOX Carolina)
Cars drive through water standing on a street in Hendersonville during rush hour. (Jan. 30, 2013/FOX Carolina) Cars drive through water standing on a street in Hendersonville during rush hour. (Jan. 30, 2013/FOX Carolina)
A power pole leans on an Inman home after stiff winds pushed it over. (Jan. 30, 2013/FOX Carolina) A power pole leans on an Inman home after stiff winds pushed it over. (Jan. 30, 2013/FOX Carolina)
GREENVILLE, SC (FOX Carolina) -

The day after a line of powerful storms moved through the western Carolinas, thousands remain without power and several streets are closed because of rising water.

By 8 p.m., the worst of the weather had moved east of the region. The heavy rain produced by the storms prompted flash flood warnings for many locations in the mountains of North Carolina.

By Thursday morning, a flood warning was still in effect for Transylvania and Henderson counties and expected to last until Friday morning. A flood advisory was also issued for Buncombe and Madison counties until late morning.

Pit Crew Traffic reported a few Asheville-area road closures because of flooding concerns Thursday morning.

Northeast of Fletcher, Cane Creek Road at U.S. 74 was closed near Cane Creek. South of downtown Asheville near the Swannanoa River, Meadow Road at Hendersonville Road/U.S. 25 was closed. And on the north side of downtown, Riverside Drive at Pearson Bridge Road was closed at the French Broad River.

SLIDESHOW: Powerful storms cause damage, flooding

There were more reports of street flooding on Wednesday in Asheville, Hendersonville and Clemson. A woman was rescued from the roof of her car in Transylvania County after she ran into flood waters near Davidson River Road. Flooding near Brevard even prompted the American Red Cross to open a shelter Wednesday night.

The North Carolina Department of Transportation reminds drivers to not attempt to cross flooded roads even if it seems shallow because 2 feet of rushing water can carry away cars, SUVs and pickups.

While winds increased ahead of the squall line Wednesday, most had died down across the area by midnight. A wind advisory was still in effect for most of western North Carolina until 6 p.m. Thursday.

The high winds ahead of the storms and inside the storms knocked down dozens of trees and power lines across western North Carolina. According to Duke Energy's website, nearly 13,000 customers were without power Wednesday night. Most of the outages were across western North Carolina, with more than 7,300 still without power Thursday morning.

In Inman, several homes were evacuated after high winds broke power poles, causing the lines to fall on the roofs.

Schools, business, colleges, churches and government agencies changed their schedules because of the threat of severe weather.

Meteorologist Alex Wilson said snow showers began along the North Carolina-Tennessee border Wednesday night, where a winter weather advisory was issued. She said accumulations will generally be light, but slick roads could cause problems, with snow showers wrapping up by mid-to-late morning.

Kent said sunshine and much cooler weather will return to the region by Thursday with highs struggling to reach 50 degrees in some locations.

Copyright 2013 FOX Carolina (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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