Film documents sex trafficking impact in Las Vegas - FOX Carolina 21

Film documents sex trafficking impact in Las Vegas

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A scene of the documentary "Trafficked No More", which highlights the prevalence of sex trafficking in Las Vegas and other places in Nevada. (Source: Vimeo) A scene of the documentary "Trafficked No More", which highlights the prevalence of sex trafficking in Las Vegas and other places in Nevada. (Source: Vimeo)
LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -

Community leaders and law enforcement on Thursday presented a first look of a documentary that takes a look at sex trafficking in Nevada.

Filmmakers for the documentary Trafficked No More produced the piece in Las Vegas, compiling true events of sex trafficking cases and their impact on the underground sex industry and prostitution of children.

The documentary also intends to highlight a recently enacted law that tightens punishment for those convicted for sex trafficking.

The half hour documentary is slated to air uninterrupted in a simulcast on Nevada television stations on Wednesday, Jan. 22 at 7:30 p.m. FOX5 agreed to be one of the stations to air the documentary.

Dignitaries including state Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto and Clark County District Attorney Steve Wolfson presented Thursday a preview trailer of the documentary during a news conference in Las Vegas.

"The documentary is a compilation of true events and details sex trafficking cases and their impact on the underground sex industry and prostitution of children," Cortez Masto said.

Cortez Masto said that in the last five years, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department has reviewed 510 cases involving forced prostitution.

"Perpetrators have discovered that human trafficking is big business, generating up to $32 billion a year in profits," she said.

One person who knows firsthand the damage the underground sex industry can do is Annie Lobert. She became a prostitute in her teens, getting out of it 11 years later.

Lobert now serves as president of a program she founded, Hookers for Jesus. The organization helps women to get out of the industry. She said Las Vegas has always been a destination for prostitution and with that frequently comes trafficking.

"When there's a convention in town - let's say CES, AVN, whatever it would be - usually women come from out of state, even out of the country to sell themselves, and at any given time there's about 10,000 workers every weekend, if not more, selling themselves," Lobert said.

Lobert said the youngest person she has helped was forced into the industry at age 10 and didn't escape until she was 19.

"Her family sold her. The age differences, it's anywhere from 10 years old up to 50, up to 60," Lobert said.

Lobert said the sex trade industry is often something women can't simply walk away from.

"Basically the girls don't own anything. They can't walk away with anything. They are being totally controlled, manipulated. Even though you might not see handcuffs on them or a gun to their head as they walk out the door, when they get home, that's what they get," she said.

Lobert said she applauds state and local authorities for putting the spotlight on human trafficking.

"We have to deal with the clients - the people and the men that are buying the girls, we have a big problem. I think we need to communicate to the men that come here to buy sex specifically that it's not OK," she said.

You can view the trailer at this link.

Copyright 2014 KVVU (KVVU Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

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