Your Day in History: Fast food and fast cars - FOX Carolina 21

Your Day in History: Fast food, fast cars and taxes

Posted: Updated:
Aftermath of an explosion at the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013. (Source: Aaron Tang/Flickr/Wikimedia Commons) Aftermath of an explosion at the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013. (Source: Aaron Tang/Flickr/Wikimedia Commons)
Bessie Smith, known as The Empress of the Blues, was born April 15, 1894. (Source: Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons) Bessie Smith, known as The Empress of the Blues, was born April 15, 1894. (Source: Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons)
Graves of people who died when RMS Titanic sank April 15, 1912. The dead were buried in Halifax, Nova Scotia. (Source: archer10/Flickr/Wikimedia Commons) Graves of people who died when RMS Titanic sank April 15, 1912. The dead were buried in Halifax, Nova Scotia. (Source: archer10/Flickr/Wikimedia Commons)
Aftermath of the Belfast Blitz on April 15, 1941. (Source: United Kingdom/Wikimedia Commons) Aftermath of the Belfast Blitz on April 15, 1941. (Source: United Kingdom/Wikimedia Commons)
A B-52H Stratofortress in flight. (Source: U.S. Air Force/Wikimedia Commons) A B-52H Stratofortress in flight. (Source: U.S. Air Force/Wikimedia Commons)

(RNN) – Week in History has returned for a one-day event: April 15.

You may know it as "Holy Moly, I Have to Send the Government a Check Day," but it's so much more than that. It's also Rubber Eraser Day, which you undoubtedly used at least once if you filled out your own unnecessarily confusing tax forms.

In terms of actual events of note (Tax Day is of note, by the way, especially if you haven't mailed the government its invoice yet), April 15 is loaded with them. Some you know – like Abraham Lincoln dying and Titanic sinking (if you don't already know these things, stop reading, Google them and learn, then come back to read about other stuff) – and some you don't – like the first Ford Mustang rolling off the showroom floor and insulin becoming available for diabetes treatment.

But we'll start with what April 15 is known for today, other than a depressing reminder that you are paying for Congress to do nothing.

This is the first anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing.

Three people were killed and more than 250 were injured when two bombs went off near the finish line. Two brothers were identified as suspects three days later, and they engaged police in an overnight shootout. One, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was killed and the other, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was found hiding in a boat the next day.

His trial is scheduled to begin in November.

Here are some other events of note that happened April 15.

Life and Death

Actress and activist Claudia Cardinale was born in 1938. She appeared in many foreign language films, but is perhaps best known for her role in Once Upon a Time in the West. She was active in promoting equal rights for women and homosexuals and starred with John Wayne in Circus World.

Leonardo da Vinci was born in 1452, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev was born in 1894, Empress of the Blues Bessie Smith was born in 1894, North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung was born in 1912, the first democratically elected female head of state Vigdis Finnbogadottir was born in 1930, Bewitched! star Elizabeth Montgomery was born in 1933, comedian Seth Rogen was born in 1982 and actress Emma Watson was born in 1990.

Abraham Lincoln died in 1865 after being shot the previous night. There is a theory that has popped up in recent years that Lincoln was close to death anyway due to a genetic disorder known as MEN2B. Several of Lincoln's physical characteristics are thought to be symptoms of the disorder, and the young deaths of his children are used as evidence.

It's a controversial theory because of Lincoln's survival to adulthood. If a diagnosis were confirmed, he would be the earliest known case of the disease. The only way to diagnose MEN2B is through DNA testing, which is difficult due to the passage of time and the value of anything connected to him.

It's been attempted, but the results were inconclusive as shown in the documentary Lincoln's Secret Killer. Lincoln is also thought to have had a neurological disorder known as ataxia.

In 1912, more than 1,500 people died when RMS Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg. Among the dead were Macy's owner Isidor Strauss and his wife, Ida, as well as real estate tycoon John Jacob Astor IV – the richest man on the ship and one of the richest in the world at that time.

Many of the dead were never recovered, and many of the recovered bodies were never identified. Most of the bodies were buried in Halifax, Nova Scotia, while others, including many of the crew, were buried at sea.

Cambodian leader Pol Pot died in 1998, and rock icon Joey Ramone died in 2001.

Overlooked Anniversaries

A Dictionary of the English Language was published in 1755. Though not the first English dictionary, it is considered one of the most important because it contained notes on word usage and passages using words in proper context. It preceded Merriam-Webster's dictionary by 73 years and the Oxford English Dictionary by 173 years.

William Wordsworth saw some daffodils in 1802 and, as writers are wont to do, got inspired. It took him two years, however, to do anything with that inspiration, but when he finally got around to it wrote I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud, even though he was walking with his sister at the time.

General Electric was formed in 1892, the investigation that uncovered the Teapot Dome bribery scandal began in 1922, Rand McNally published its first road atlas in 1924, the Great Mississippi Flood – the most destructive river flood in U.S. history – began in 1927, McDonald's was founded in 1955, the civil rights organization Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee was founded in 1960 and the Tiananmen Square protests began in 1989.

Something About Sports

Jackie Robinson made his debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. No African-American had played in Major League Baseball since 1888.

Nearly 100 soccer fans were killed in 1989 in what is known as the Hillsborough disaster. Some gates to the stadium in Sheffield, England, were closed and the stadium could not handle the crowd. People outside the stadium for an FA Cup semifinal match heard cheering as the teams – Liverpool and Nottingham Forest – ran onto the field and rushed to get inside. More than 750 were injured.

The Week in Warfare

Preliminary articles of peace ending the Revolutionary War were ratified in 1783, and nearly four score years later Abraham Lincoln asked for 75,000 volunteers to help end the Civil War, which started three days prior with the Battle of Fort Sumter. They were asked to serve for three months, but the war lasted nearly four years.

Nine hundred people were killed in the Belfast Blitz, a German bombing raid on Belfast, in 1941.

The Bergen-Belsen concentration camp was liberated in 1945, and the B-52 made its first flight in 1952. The B-52 – based at Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier City, LA, and Minot Air Force Base in Minot, ND, is still flying 62 years later. Current plans have it serving until at least 2045.

Holiday You Should Celebrate

In addition to being Tax Day, it is also World Art Day. This is the third World Art Day, which was established to honor Leonardo da Vinci's birthday.

As said before, it's also Rubber Eraser Day, so go make a mistake.

Copyright 2013 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

  • Your Day in History: Fast food, fast cars and taxesMore>>

Powered by WorldNow
Fox Carolina
Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2014, WHNS; Greenville, SC. (A Meredith Corporation Station) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.