Of Non-Marijuana Drug Users in the ER, Nearly All Are Problem Drug Users - FOX Carolina 21

Of Non-Marijuana Drug Users in the ER, Nearly All Are Problem Drug Users

Information contained on this page is provided by an independent third-party content provider. WorldNow and this Station make no warranties or representations in connection therewith. If you have any questions or comments about this page please contact pressreleases@worldnow.com.

SOURCE American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP)

WASHINGTON, July 7, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Of emergency patients who reported any drug other than marijuana as their primary drug of use, 90.7 percent met the criteria for problematic drug use.  Among patients who reported cannabis (marijuana) as their primary drug, almost half (46.6 percent) met the criteria for having a drug problem, according to a study published online Thursday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("Identifying Patients with Problematic Drug Use in the Emergency Department: Results of a Multi-Site Study") http://www.annemergmed.com/article/S0196-0644%2814%2900417-X/fulltext.

"Of patients who reported any drug use in the previous 30 days, nearly two-thirds were identified as problem drug users," said lead study author Wendy Macias-Konstantopoulos, MD, MPH, or the Department of Emergency Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Mass.  "These patients also tended to require many more medical resources in the emergency department.  Identifying which patients have problematic drug use is an important first step for emergency providers who are in a unique position to intervene and mitigate the effects of drug abuse."

Researchers screened patients using the Tobacco, Alcohol, Drug Questionnaire.  Of 3,240 patients who reported drug use in the previous month, 64.3 percent met the criteria for problematic drug use.  Non-cannabis drug users identified as problem drug users were more likely to be 30 or older and have a resource-intense ER triage level.  Cannabis users identified as problem drug users were more likely to be younger than 30.  Both cannabis and non-cannabis users identified as problem drug users were more likely to smoke, drink daily or binge drink alcohol and use drugs daily.  Nearly all the patients (91 percent) who believed their emergency department visit was related to drug use met the criteria for problematic drug use.

"Emergency patients with unmet substance abuse treatment needs incur higher health care costs than their counterparts," said Dr. Macias-Konstantopoulos.  "Patients with drug problems who visit the ER may present 'teachable moments'. An emergency department-based effort to connect problematic drug users with treatment could ultimately decrease overall health care costs."

Annals of Emergency Medicine is the peer-reviewed scientific journal for the American College of Emergency Physicians, the national medical society representing emergency medicine. ACEP is committed to advancing emergency care through continuing education, research, and public education. Headquartered in Dallas, Texas, ACEP has 53 chapters representing each state, as well as Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. A Government Services Chapter represents emergency physicians employed by military branches and other government agencies. For more information, visit www.acep.org.

www.annemergmed.com
Twitter @emergencydocs
For more information, visit:
http://newsroom.acep.org

ACEP Logo.

Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20100616/DC22034LOGO-d

©2012 PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by WorldNow
Fox Carolina
Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2014, WHNS; Greenville, SC. (A Meredith Corporation Station) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.