Photographers warn solar eclipse could damage cameras if they ar - FOX Carolina 21

Photographers warn solar eclipse could damage cameras if they are not protected

Posted: Updated:
just before the big moment and directly after, experts said it will be bright enough to damage camera equipment. just before the big moment and directly after, experts said it will be bright enough to damage camera equipment.
(FOX Carolina) -

Most of the time, you can find David Junker’s eye pressed to a view finder, waiting for the perfect shot.

"A lens is a lot like a magnifying glass," Junker said.

A magnifying glass that allows him see things through different perspectives. Junker said he's been waiting his whole life for an opportunity to film something as rare as the upcoming eclipse.

"When the total eclipse actually occurs and the moon is blocking the sun it's going to be very dark," Junker said.

However, just before the big moment and directly after, he said it will be bright enough to damage camera equipment.

"The intensity of the sun when it comes through the lens is magnified and the intensity is magnified to the point where it can actually damage the auto focus sensors inside the lens,” Junker said. “It can also damage the sensors inside the camera as well as the shutter."

He said there's a lot that can go wrong without proper protection. He warns, a common UV filter will not be enough. He said folks need to have a specialized solar filter.

"Or a neutral density filter,” Junker said. “A neutral density filter is a lot like putting really dark sunglasses on the front of your camera and it blocks a lot of that light from passing through."

He says without it, sensors will burn and the damage will be costly.

"In a lot of cases, it's actually more expensive to replace the damaged sensor than it is to replace the entire camera,” Junker said. “So if you do sustain damage, chances are the camera is no longer usable."

These days, it's mostly smart phones that catch the big moments. Tech experts warn they can also be damaged from the direct sunlight.

"Don't use your smartphone to try to record it because the radiation is going to be higher and so you don't want to damage that,” said Dr. Shelly Meyers from Limestone College. “It would be better for you to use that as a stopwatch or use your globe observer app to record things."

Copyright 2017 FOX Carolina (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly
Fox Carolina
Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2017, WHNS; Greenville, SC. (A Meredith Corporation Station) . All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.