COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The South Carolina Supreme Court has ruled a state law preventing anyone from moving a Confederate monument or changing the historical name of a street or building without the Legislature's permission is legal.

But in the same ruling Wednesday, the justices struck down a requirement that two-thirds of the General Assembly must approve a move or name change.

The ruling keeps intact South Carolina's Heritage Act. The 2000 law has prevented colleges and local governments from removing Confederate monuments or the names of segregationists from buildings.

“I want to thank the Supreme Court for a very scholarly, well-considered, and well-documented opinion. Their unanimous ruling confirms our earlier opinion on the Heritage Act," said South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson. "We agree with the Court that the compromise concerning the Flag and which led to passage of the Heritage Act is one of the great achievements in South Carolina history.”

Lawmakers have refused to even take up any requests to remove monuments over the past few years even as other Southern cities act.

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Thunderhead

Greenville News headline: "SC Supreme Court's Heritage Act ruling will make it easier to remove Confederate monuments"

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