GREENVILLE, SC (FOX Carolina) -- Brittany Lawson was jogging with her dog along Augusta Street exactly one month ago when she was killed in a hit-and-run. Tonight Greenville city leaders and SCDOT officials will meet near where the tragedy happened to brainstorm ideas on how to prevent something similar from happening again. 

Tonight Greenville city leaders and SCDOT officials will meet near where last month's hit-and-run happened to brainstorm ideas on how to prevent something similar from happening again. Fox Carolina's Grace Runkel tells us what neighbors are saying.

 
Augusta Street neighbors are invited to a pedestrian safety open house at Westminster Presbyterian Church tonight to discuss with officials how they can make the busy street safer for pedestrians.
 
The open house-style meeting runs from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 
 
We spoke with Dolores Kaiser and Linda Huffington as they walked along Augusta Street -- not far from where 38-year-old Lawson was killed. The two sisters told us their top concern is speed. 
 
"It's frightful to see how fast these cars and trucks are going," Kaiser said. "I don't know what the answer is, but I know that you're taking your life in your hands when you walk up and down these streets."
 
The speed limit on the block is 30 MPH, but Kaiser said she knows people are going faster than that. The speed limit sign blinks red and flashes the speed of drivers going by. 
 
"I mean those trucks, if they ever hit anything, that'd be the end of that thing," Kaiser said.
 
We decided to see how many drivers were going too fast.
 
In a span of 5 minutes the sign flashed red at least 33 times. Two drivers topped out at 42 MPH. 
 
We wanted to find out how dangerous speeding cars can be for pedestrians and found several studies saying the risk of a person getting injured or killed by a car going 30 MPH is already 45%.
 
So when these drivers speed along Augusta Street, those odds increase. 
 
"Not feeling safe walking is a determent to good health," said Huffington, who has walking paths near her home.
 
She said something similar should be considered for the Augusta Street area. 
 
Kaiser said the solution is simple: it's time for police to start cracking down.
 
"When people find out that an area is ticketed, they get real serious about slowing down," she said. 

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